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Driving Range Etiquette 101

Driving Range Etiquette 101

Driving Range Etiquette 101

divots

As I’m sitting down to write about etiquette at the driving range, I’m thinking perhaps I should be consulting my son, John, who at 5 years old already spends as much time at the range as I do. In fact, as he not only participates in The First Tee program but several other golf camps. so he is quite aware of the many poor decisions golfers make while at the driving range.

And since he is just a kid, John makes it a point to mention in a loud and clear voice each and every single etiquette breach he sees like, “Hey, dad, that guy is picking his nose!” Or how about not grouping your divots in the chipping area, using the seeders or replacing them when you can? Those are probably some of the worst offenses.

driving-range-etiquettea

Practice correct divot replacement, please. We gotta come back here.

Here are just a few more practice range faux pas. Are you guilty of committing any?

Range ball thieves are distracting. Even the cute ones.

Range ball thieves are distracting. Even the cute ones.

The Happy Wanderer

You see them every time you’re at the range. You know, the people who have either run out of balls and want to top just one more driver 25 yards or those who really take the phrase “getting the most bang for your buck” too literally and feel they can stealthily sneak out on the range and grab a few more balls to hit.

 

Typically, you catch them out of the corner of your eye as you are in your backswing at the next hitting bay — just enough of a glimpse to make you try to either halt your swing a’ la Tiger Woods style or take your eye of the ball just long enough to turn that nice easy wedge into a Sir Shanks a lot.

Just because they play luau music near the courses in Hawaii doesn't give you permission to bring your boom box to the range.

Just because they play luau music near the courses in Hawaii doesn’t give you permission to bring your boom box to the range.

My Music Rocks!

I think it is perfectly acceptable to listen to some tunes while you go through your practice routine, and, in fact, I do often.

But the key to doing this the right way is — ding ding ding — you guessed it: headphones or earbuds. It would seem to fall into the category of common sense.

However, just the other day at the range, a few bays down, a guy actually pulls out a radio, tunes in his favorite station and proceeds to blast his music (And I use the term “music” very lightly.) for all other golfers within a 2-mile radius. My ears are still ringing. Listen, do everyone a favor and bring your headphones next time. While we are all very impressed you know all the words to “Wrecking Ball.” we’d rather just watch you lip-sync it like most of today’s pop stars do themselves.

Nuff said

(Don’t!) Smoke ‘em if ya got ‘em

While a nice cigar is a little guilty pleasure of mine from time to time out on the course, under no circumstances would I fire up my stogie at the practice range. Most but not all ranges have “No Smoking” signs posted. Not only are there little kids at the range, but the range itself is a much smaller area than the golf course. So, when someone lights up, everyone gets a face full of smoke. 

Here’s another behavior to avoid (heh. heh.):

 

 


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