aka, The Golf Geek

 

 

 

 

A long time ago I worked at Kokesh Golf and Athletic at the Southtown location.  You can’t find it now.  A Kohl’s store sits approximately where Kokesh once was.  For a while, Kokesh was THE place to go if you wanted to find top line equipment, apparel and lettering on your jackets or team jerseys.  That place had it all.

It was there I first learned about club-fitting.  That not everyone should just buy off the rack and go hit the links.  Only to have the customer come back after a week and wonder why they are digging or hitting shots off the toe.  And want a full refund.  So I was taught about Static club fitting (I didn’t know it was called that until the next century, this was the late 80’s….and yes, I am dating myself!!).  Basically, what I was told to do was have a customer hold the prospective club of their choice and let the club sit on the ground.  I would then take a business card and slide it under the club head both from the toe and then the heel of the club.  The further I slid the card, the higher the toe or heel was from the ground.  In early club-fitting days, the goal was to order the clubs so that the sole of the club sat flat with the ground and hardly any of the card would slide in from either the toe or the heel of the club.  The thinking was that if we set the customer up with clubs that sat flat, then the club would be less likely to dig in.  Many manufacturers and club-makers lived (and died) by this method.

Kind of quaint and old fashioned isn’t it?

ping nflight technology at 2nd swing golf

Ping nFlight technology @ 2nd Swing Golf, Minneapolis

Now there are hitting bays; with the capability to measure club head speed, ball speed, spin rate, where the club makes contact with the ball.  Which leads us to Dynamic club fitting.  Dynamic club fitting wants to know where the sole of the club is at the point of impact.  Who cares if the club sits flat at address?  You are not hitting the ball with the club just sitting there.  A person’s swing actually dictates what particular lie they be fitted.

 

Case in point:  I am about 5’5” depending on the shoes (I too love Linkswear shoes, but I feel like I’m about 5’3” in them) and the first (static) impression is that I should be fitted with irons that are flatter than a standard lie.  But, my down swing comes into the ball relatively steep.  I have my irons 2 degrees upright.  My golfing friend Scott (you know him as the general manager of 2nd Swing Minnetonka) stands over 6 feet tall, and he has his irons set about 2 degrees flat, but a ½ inch longer than standard.

So, when getting fitted at 2nd Swing, go in with an open mind and let them determine the correct, lie, shaft (you’re not a wuss if you need a regular shaft guys.  Ladies if you need a men’s senior flex, accept it, you’ll love the better distance and control), and grip size.  You may be surprised by what they tell you.  But you’ll be even more pleasantly surprised when you make better, more consistent contact with the ball and you scores start to come down.

Anyone else have old Kokesh stories?  I know too many….

 

 

About The Author

Warren Bailey is a former golf professional, golf club manager, Golf Galaxy store manager and aspiring chef who loves a good gin and tonic as much as making an eagle 3 on a long par-5. Bailey is a 4 handicap who plays right and putts left-handed and currently works as the Sales/Business development manager for American Metro Point of Sale.

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