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The Art of Golf Clubsmithing: Hot Melting and Club-Bias Weighting

The Art of Golf Clubsmithing: Hot Melting and Club-Bias Weighting

The Art of Golf Clubsmithing: Hot Melting and Club-Bias Weighting

How custom golf club work can improve your game

“You can talk to a fade, but a hook won’t listen.” – Lee Trevino

Words that can easily be understood by anyone who has lost a drive deep out to their weak side. The question really is: “How do I correct this?” 

There are drills and training aids to help your clubface become more square with the ball on impact. These can help you build good habits, but there is an additional way of going about this. 

Add weight to the toe of your driver.  

With a heavy toe, you could add resistance between you and closing the clubface on impact. Lead tape is a solution, although not one that is as structurally sleek as other options.

It's increasingly important to understand the parts of a driver since they are becoming increasingly adjustable.

It’s become important to understand the parts of a driver since they are becoming increasingly adjustable.

Now, you may hit the TaylorMade SLDR driver, a SuperQuad — or any other driver with adjustable weights. That would mean that you can adjust the sliding/fixed weights to become fade or draw biased.

Fade biased is to help get the ball to hook less from right to left.

And draw biased is to help the ball slice less from left to right (That’s for right-handers.).

To have a club with a fade bias, we would add weight to the toe of the driver. This is to try and help keep the face more open at impact. Thus removing the spin that causes a hook.

fade bias diagram

For a club with draw bias, we would add weight to  the heel of the driver. This would try and help close the face on impact. Thus removing the spin that causes a slice. 

draw bias diagram

I found a lot of language out on the Internet that really confused me on which was a draw bias and which was a fade bias, so hopefully this will be a bit clearer. 

Now for how hot melting applies to all of this. Hot Melting is a procedure where a driver is internally filled with a specific amount of a special glue/adhesive. If the glue is added to the toe, the club can help you hook the ball less. If the weight is added to the heel, hot melting can help you slice less. 

fade

There also is an affect on the sound of the club when you insert hotmelt. This soft glue can help take the bang out of your driver by absorbing/dampening the sound waves bouncing around in your driver just after impact. So if your club needs a silencer, you can add some hot melt to the very center of your driver as to not offset the weight of your driver. 

Is there a rattle in your driver? Small pieces of old glue and metal can clang in your head making it seem like you have a long maraca at the tee. With hot melt adhesive in your driver, those loose pieces will stick to the adhesive and stop that jingle-jangle. 

A good question here is: “Does hot melting aid players with straight or very controlled ball flight paths?”

Yes, hot melting is something that is done on tour to help subtle ball-flight adjustments. If we want the ball to have a slight bend to the right, we add a slight amount of hot melt to the toe. The same concept can be applied to your driver with the proper fitting and attention. 

Weight balancing a club to the correct settings after a custom 2nd Swing golfsmithing adjustment.

Weight balancing a club to the correct settings after a custom 2nd Swing golfsmithing adjustment.

2nd Swing Golf offers free fittings for any clubs purchased from us. We use the same hot melting technologies as the TaylorMade Tour Van.

If you want to have an adjustment done on your club, have your club fit at one of our two Minnesota store locations. We can help you find what bias you need.

Or if you already know what you want done with your club, please contact us or our on-staff clubsmith Robert Reitz directly via email at robert@2ndswing.com to discuss what modification you desire and to what specifications. If you would like help over the phone on what works best for you, please call (612) 216-4152.

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