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USGA Golf Science on Kinematics and Putting

USGA Golf Science on Kinematics and Putting

USGA Golf Science on Kinematics and Putting

Another segment from a cool YouTube series on the science of golf. This time it explores kinematics (What?), stimpmeters (Huh?) and regulating green speed for better play.

USGA Golf Science Series from NBC and golf’s ruling body.

Wow, a lot goes into putting. Check it all out:

Two-time LPGA Major champ Suzann Petterson and PGA Pro Drew Weaver help explore the physics of golf, in particular, the science behind reading the green and putting. The speed of the green is measured with the stimpmeter (more on that in the video). Pro and other high-level players use this information to try to conquer courses since greens keepers regulate the speed of the turf with the device and then provide players with that information so they can adjust their games (This is high-level stuff. And fascinating.).

kinematics

An official USGA stimpmeter used to measure the consistent speed of greens.

As for kinematics, that’s the science behind measurements or a combination of position, velocity and acceleration, but you’re better off just watching to get a decent understanding. Maybe twice. In this segment, for instance, the USGA and NBC Learn partner to explore just how kinematics is used with the meter to measure green speed and then translate that into a standardized number used to determine how to approach the all-important short game, which often gets the short end of the shaft.

The series is not only meant to help us understand some of the science involved in golf, but also how to put that knowledge to use to improve your own game. Next time you’re at the course, ask about the stimpmeter number. Figure out what your speeds are first, though. And hit them consistently. Ha.


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